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Why You Should Use a Conveyancing Solicitor

Residential & Investment Property - April 2nd, 2019

A Conveyancing Solicitor plays an important role in the transaction of any property; their main job is to protect the interests of their clients throughout each process.

What does a Conveyancing Solicitor do?

A Conveyancing Solicitor plays an important role in the transaction of any property; their main job is to protect the interests of their clients throughout each process.

The role of a Conveyancing Solicitor differs depending on which part of the property transaction they are dealing with.

Selling a Property

The Conveyancing Solicitor will obtain copies of the title deeds and draw up draft contracts to be sent to the purchaser’s solicitor. They will also deal with any enquires the purchaser’s solicitor may raise. If a mortgage is to be paid off, a Conveyancing Solicitor will apply for a redemption letter from the lender. If the property is leasehold, separate enquires will need to be sent to the landlord/freeholder and replies will need to be reviewed and forwarded to the purchaser’s solicitor.

A Conveyancing Solicitor will take the headache out of having to liaise with estate agents, lenders and the purchaser's solicitor and will do it all on your behalf. They will also work on contract exchanges and link these with any related purchase as well as deal with completion formalities, such as ensuring the signed transfer deed and all original deeds and documents are sent to the purchaser's solicitor upon completion.

Purchasing a Property

When dealing with purchasing a property a Conveyancing Solicitor will check the legal title, contract documentation and raise any enquires. They will also carry out all searches associated with the property and report them to their client purchasing the property and liaise with any mortgage lenders, estate agents and seller solicitors.

A professional Conveyancing Solicitor will also advise on additional costs such as leasehold notice fees, exchange contracts, Stamp Duty and deal with completion and also arrange for their client along with the lender to be registered at the Land Registry following completion.

Benefits of a conveyancing solicitor

Everyone has the option to do their own Conveyancing and there is nothing stopping you for doing so, however, there are a few pitfalls you should be aware of before undertaking such a mammoth task.

When hiring a Conveyancing Solicitor their main responsibility is to coordinate all those involved towards the final transfer of the property. They correspond on your behalf between the seller / purchasing solicitors and the lenders. A Conveyancing Solicitor will ensure all the many small but significant steps involved are completed correctly – such filing paperwork with the relevant authorities and conducting the correct property checks.

Using an experienced professional adds a level of security, their knowledge and expertise give them the advantage in identifying any potential problems that may arise. It is also worth noting most mortgage lenders insist on a professional overseeing a property purchase or sale, in order to protect their interests and reduce any chances of crimes being committed under the guise of a property transaction.

Why choose Eatons Solicitors

We have helped thousands of people move home we can help to guide you through any property buying, selling, remortgaging and equity release process.

If you are first time buyer or property investor and require some legal advice – Eatons Solicitors are here for you.

Our online tools can give you further guidance into the process of buying and selling, along with estimating your conveyancing fees.

DISCLAIMER: the contents of this article and any documents on our website are not intended to constitute legal advice but are intended for general information purposes only. We are not responsible for any loss resulting from acts or omissions taken in respect of the content presented herein. Please see our legal and regulatory information, privacy and terms policy on our website.